The end of the console? Microsoft shows off xCloud system that lets you play high quality games on your phone without having to buy an Xbox

  • Will let users remotely play Xbox consoles located in Microsoft server centers
  • Users will be able to connect Xbox controller to phone or use on screen joysticks
  • Public trials of the system set to begin later this year, the company has revealed

Mark Prigg For Dailymail.com In Redmond

Microsoft has revealed the first details of a radical new streaming service that doesn’t require players to buy a console.

Called xCloud, it streams games from specially built Xbox One consoles housed in Microsoft’s server farms around the world.

Users can stream games to their phone, tablet or TV, allowing them to play the games anywhere in the world.

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Microsoft has revealed the first details of a radical new streaming service that doesn’t require players to buy a console. Microsoft has not revealed any details of the pricing for the service, but is expected to offer it as a monthly subscription

Microsoft has revealed the first details of a radical new streaming service that doesn’t require players to buy a console. Microsoft has not revealed any details of the pricing for the service, but is expected to offer it as a monthly subscription


Microsoft has revealed the first details of a radical new streaming service that doesn’t require players to buy a console. Microsoft has not revealed any details of the pricing for the service, but is expected to offer it as a monthly subscription

HOW PROJECT XCLOUD WILL WORK 

Users will connect over the internet to their own dedicated Xbox console located in Microsoft’s giant server farms around the globe.

Using a mobile phone, tablet or other device, the live video will be streamed to their device. Using either on screen controls or a joypad, users will play in exactly the same way as if they were using a console.

The key to the service, Microsoft admits, is getting speeds fast enough that the user doesn’t notice a lag between moving the controller and the game changing.

Microsoft has developed special Xbox server, each containing eight consoles, to test the service, and already has them up and running in a data center in Quincy, near its Redmond HQ.

 

Microsoft’s Xbox boss Phil Spencer told Dailymail.com he hopes the new service will boost the amount of time spent playing games.

‘This is not a replacement for consoles,’ he said.

‘When I’m at home, I’m probably going to be playing on my Xbox One console, and we believe millions and millions of people will still want to do that.

‘But, when I’m away from home, or that TV is being used for something else, this is an amazing option for me to carry on playing.’

Microsoft has not revealed any details of the pricing for the service, but is expected to offer it as a monthly subscription.

Spencer also addressed speculation the service could eat into Microsoft’s console sales.

‘It’s not cannibalistic, people will play more,’ he said.

‘The business for us is not selling hardware, the business is selling games and access to games. We really put the player at the center of every decision.’

Users can stream games to their phone, tablet or TV, allowing them to play the games anywhere in the world

Users can stream games to their phone, tablet or TV, allowing them to play the games anywhere in the world

Users can stream games to their phone, tablet or TV, allowing them to play the games anywhere in the world

Kareem Choudhry, Corporate Vice President, Cloud Gaming said he believed the time was right for a streaming service, with Amazon, Apple and Google all developing rivals.

‘We believe now is the time for a game streaming service, people now expect streaming entertainment.’

The service will compete with Google’s ‘Project Stream’, a game streaming service that is being tested in partnership with game publisher Ubisoft . 

Amazon is also believed to be developing its own cloud gaming service, and has been developing games through its own internal studio, with Apple also rumored to be working on streaming. 

Microsoft for the first time showed the service working live.

Microsoft also revealed the latest version of the specially designed Xbox servers, each of which contains the equivalent of eight consoles

Microsoft also revealed the latest version of the specially designed Xbox servers, each of which contains the equivalent of eight consoles

Microsoft also revealed the latest version of the specially designed Xbox servers, each of which contains the equivalent of eight consoles

Called xCloud, it streams games from specially built Xbox One consoles housed in Microsoft’s server farms around the world

Called xCloud, it streams games from specially built Xbox One consoles housed in Microsoft’s server farms around the world

Called xCloud, it streams games from specially built Xbox One consoles housed in Microsoft’s server farms around the world

Forza, Crackdown and a platform game called Lucky’s Tale were demonstrated on phones and tablets, with no discernible lag. 

Games were played using an Xbox controller or on screen joysticks, and the games looked smooth and fast.

Microsoft also revealed the latest version of the specially designed Xbox servers, each of which contains the equivalent of eight consoles.

Microsoft has also installed the servers in the Quincy data center close to its Redmond HQ.

Choudhry said the firm will begin public trials of the system this year, and is expected to reveal more details of the plan at the E3 gaming conference in Los Angeles in June.

 

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